recipe
Mar
22
2011

Practicing What You Preach

There are so very many places I could go with this on this Tuesday morning in March but I won’t.  I will spare you a lecture.  I would say sermon but that would be ludicrous ;) So this fine March day I will just say it feels good when you actually practice what you preach in relation to what you eat.  Last night our supper consisted of nothing more than what we grew here on our little property or killed locally.

locavores

Our middle son provided our meat from a deer he killed in the fall.  A fine, lean backstrap that Jerry put on the grill – and it was delicious.  The cole slaw is made from green and purple cabbages and carrots we grew.  The sliced carrots are from our garden and I sauted them with a pat of butter and sprinkled a little saffron on them – I LOVE saffron!  The asparagus is from either the 4th or 5th picking so far this season – perfect just warmed in a skillet with a touch of olive oil, salt and pepper.  As with most meals while Jerry is home, it was a team effort, even the clean up :)

Some one asked last night over on Facebook what we plant and when.  Here is a quick rundown.

We have something planted all the time. Early Spring (now) we plant tomatoes (some I had started in the greenhouse), peppers, squash, green beans, corn, cucumbers, herbs and flowers. No later than July 4th, but hopefully before,  I need to have my pumpkins in the ground. I will probably start them mid April – first of May to give them a head start. I would like to harvest them well before I go on vacation October 16 and have them delivered to their new homes :) .  All that depends on when the corn is ready. The pumpkins are planted when we pull the corn stalks. Then early September we plant winter stuff like carrots, lettuce, cabbage, Brussels Sprouts, English peas, sometimes radishes. And it all starts over…

I will try to snap some pictures this afternoon of Jerry’s hard work from yesterday.  He set out a couple of tomato plants I had started in the greenhouse and got beans in the ground.  We will pick up more tomatoes, bell peppers and a few herbs today while we are in the city.  Oh and our window box selections, whatever they end up being. If our top soil is delivered by Wednesday, he will get the corn planted in the corn patch.  If it looks like it won’t, then likely he will go ahead and plant anyway and we will put out top soil after corn and before pumpkins.

That’s it for this morning except for these last few photos.  I have to go do something with my hair before it revolts completely.  Can’t go to Jerry’s dr’s appt with a mop on my head!

firstsigns

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Connie

What a delicious and healthy supper! Great food photos too. I miss getting to enjoy the great-tastin’ vegetables from our garden, during my childhood and teen years. Although Daddy and Mama did most of the gardening work, we kiddos pitched in too. Nothing tastes better than fresh veggies—especially from your own garden. Made the hard work so worth it, although I certainly did my fair share of complaining when it was time to pick peas, beans, etc. Sometimes I so miss those simpler, more relaxed days.

Victoria

What a lovely dinner and I am sure it does your heart good to know it was grown by you or hunted by your son. The photographs of the Brussel’s sprouts and carrots are beautiful and that adorable little gardener and the emerging asparagus are cute as can be. Have a good day.
Hugs,
Victoria

where do you live? In the US, what zone? It’s still too early here in Virginia to plant. Still a frost chance until mid April. But I agee, it’s nice to eat fresh and what you’ve grown yourself.

How lovely Susan. We put our early potatoes in yesterday and I harvested some of my rhubarb to make a pie. It is a bit early yet to put in much of anything else here.

Yum…Yum… Home grown and good for you! Love the photos… thank you so much for sharing!

Hugs and veggies
Victoria in Houston